How to Make a Flax Egg for Vegan Baking

Tremendously versatile in use, we include flax eggs in everything from our plant-based meatballs to our vegan cookies and pancakes. It’s a great egg substitute for binding in egg-free baking or cooking. In this post, we will tell you all about what a flax egg is, how to make one, and when to use it. We’ll also share our favorite recipes from the blog that use ground flaxseed.

Tremendously versatile in use, we include flax eggs in everything from our plant-based meatballs to our vegan cookies and pancakes. It’s a great egg substitute for binding in egg-free baking or cooking. In this post, we will tell you all about what a flax egg is, how to make one, and when to use it. We’ll also share our favorite recipes from the blog that use ground flaxseed.


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If you’ve spent any amount of time searching vegan baked goods recipes on the internet, you are almost certain to have come across an ingredient labeled “flax egg.” 

And, if you’re new to vegan cooking, you might be like “Flax? Isn’t flax that stuff from the fairy tales always getting some princess in trouble?? WTF IS A FLAX EGG? ” 

Don’t worry. You’re not alone. We’ve all gone through it. 

We use ground flaxseed and flax “eggs” in cooking and baking a lot these days. Ground flax is a tremendously versatile ingredient, and it’s a nutrition powerhouse. 

We’ve used the “eggs” in recipes for such a long time, but we’ve never really thought to write a post about it. Until you all started asking us all your questions. Then we remembered just how little we understood about this intriguing ingredient when we started veganizing some of our favorite recipes. 

You asked for a post explaining flax and flax eggs. So, here it is! 

Tremendously versatile in use, we include flax eggs in everything from our plant-based meatballs to our vegan cookies and pancakes. It’s a great egg substitute for binding in egg-free baking or cooking. In this post, we will tell you all about what a flax egg is, how to make one, and when to use it. We’ll also share our favorite recipes from the blog that use ground flaxseed.

What is a flax egg?

Not the sort of egg to be eaten on its own, a flax egg is a mixture of one part ground flax seed to three parts water. The flax “egg” is meant to be added as an egg replacer to baked goods (and other recipes) for binding purposes. And what a great replacer it is. 

Also, the flavor of flax itself is so subtle it will not change the taste of your baked goods at all. However, try to get the golden variety over the brown or it may slightly change their color.

Flax Egg Nutrition Facts

Chicken eggs may have a bit more protein, but that’s where the comparison ends for the egg. 

Flax, while also having protein and calcium, is a great source of Omega-3 and many of the B vitamins. It’s particularly high in B1 (Thiamine), which enables glucose metabolism and converts carbs to energy. Low in sugar and high in fiber, flax is also tremendously high in magnesium, as well as phosphorus, zinc, and iron! 

Eggs also have all the cholesterol (1 egg = 186 mg or 62% daily cholesterol intake!) and zero, yes ZERO, fiber. Speaking of fiber, did you know cloth fibers spun from flax are known as linen…like your napkin or shirt!

How to Make a Flax Egg

Add 1 Tablespoon ground flaxseed + 3 Tablespoons lukewarm water to a small bowl and mix with a fork until both ingredients are fully combined. 

Tremendously versatile in use, we include flax eggs in everything from our plant-based meatballs to our vegan cookies and pancakes. It’s a great egg substitute for binding in egg-free baking or cooking. In this post, we will tell you all about what a flax egg is, how to make one, and when to use it. We’ll also share our favorite recipes from the blog that use ground flaxseed.

Then, set this bowl aside to allow the flax egg to thicken for at least 5 minutes before using it. It will be all gelatinous and thick and ready to go!

Tremendously versatile in use, we include flax eggs in everything from our plant-based meatballs to our vegan cookies and pancakes. It’s a great egg substitute for binding in egg-free baking or cooking. In this post, we will tell you all about what a flax egg is, how to make one, and when to use it. We’ll also share our favorite recipes from the blog that use ground flaxseed.

Make sure you use GROUND flaxseed for your flax eggs. The seeds need to be broken (ground) for the chemical reaction making your flax eggs gelatinous to occur.

Also, your digestive system has a very difficult time breaking down the seeds in their original form, so grinding the seeds helps your body actually absorb the nutritive properties of the flax. 

How to Store Flaxseed

  • Higher quality flaxseed (unground) can be kept in the freezer for several years – though some say room temp is fine, if it’s dark. If you can, get the seed form and grind some yourself from time to time as needed. An old coffee grinder is the perfect tool for this. We’ve also used a food processor for larger quantities.
  • Quality flax, once ground, can be kept in the freezer and lasts a full year or two before becoming rancid and unuseable. 
  • Lesser quality flax can turn in 6-8 months. 
  • Bad flax is recognizable by a fishy smell it gives off when rancid.

Flaxseed Meal Substitution Option

Chia seeds (yes, THAT ch-ch-ch-chia) can also be used to create a binding egg replacer and works remarkably similar to flax. 

The chia seeds, unlike flax, do not need to be ground. The measurements are the same as for a flax egg: 3 Tbsp water + 1 Tbsp chia seed. See, chia’s more than just a decorative dorm-room plant or gag gift! 

Can you make flax eggs ahead of time and save them for later?

This is not recommended. The mixture becomes too gelatinous over time and takes on a different chemical structure. I believe the scientific term is “gummy”. These take 10 seconds to make and sit for 5 minutes. Do it first before you gather the rest of the ingredients for your recipe.

Tremendously versatile in use, we include flax eggs in everything from our plant-based meatballs to our vegan cookies and pancakes. It’s a great egg substitute for binding in egg-free baking or cooking. In this post, we will tell you all about what a flax egg is, how to make one, and when to use it. We’ll also share our favorite recipes from the blog that use ground flaxseed.

Do flax eggs really work?

Sure they do! People have been using ground flax in baking for millenia. When the ground flaxseed is combined with water it creates a gelatinous mixture that will bind and emulsify like an egg.

The water also retained in the flax egg mixture serves to provide moisture similar to an egg white as well. In some instances however, the recipe may not rise as much because of differences in protein elasticity which creates more steam (causing lift). 

A flax egg will NOT work for:

First things first. Don’t be fooled by the name, friends. These are not eggs and should not be used for egg-centric dishes like:

  • Scrambled eggs – We use tofu for scrambled eggs or a vegan egg product like Just Egg.
  • Quiche – We have a tofu quiche recipe for this.
  • Fried eggs – This is the vegan fried egg recipe we use for that.

When to use a flax egg:

Use a flax egg whenever you need a good egg-free binder but when eggs aren’t the main ingredient. Stuff like:

  • Cookies
  • Pancakes
  • Veggie burgers 
  • Vegan meatballs

How do I substitute flaxseed for eggs? Use 1 flax egg to replace each chicken egg in your recipe. It’s that simple!

Tremendously versatile in use, we include flax eggs in everything from our plant-based meatballs to our vegan cookies and pancakes. It’s a great egg substitute for binding in egg-free baking or cooking. In this post, we will tell you all about what a flax egg is, how to make one, and when to use it. We’ll also share our favorite recipes from the blog that use ground flaxseed.

Other Ways to Use Ground Flaxseed (Advanced Class)

There may even be times – like making our potato pancakes or our waffles – when you can just put some ground flax directly into a recipe to act as a binder or thickener without making the “egg” separately

Perhaps the recipe just needs some binding without adding more liquid to it. This does require a bit of trial and error after you understand how ground flax works molecularly. That understanding occurs after experimenting with flax eggs a bit.

Flax can also be a great thickener for quick tomato sauce/gravy for pasta! It not only helps cut the cook time incredibly, but it also gives that sauce a huge boost of vitamins and minerals…and you get more sauce! I also like to add a teaspoon or two of dry flax to my morning oatmeal or smoothie. 

The use of ground flax and flax “eggs” in your cooking and baking will create so many new facets to your growing abilities as a fantastic vegan cook! Give this diverse, useful, and healthful ingredient a try in some of your favorite recipes or try some of the recipes we have listed below.

Recipes that use flax eggs / flaxseed:

Do you have a question about flax eggs we didn’t go over in this post? Let us know in the comments!

And when you do try using flax eggs, let us know how it goes by tagging us in your egg-free baking creations on Instagram! If you’re not already hanging out with us over there, we’re @theplantpowercouple with the “the”.

Bake on, friends!

Yield: 1 flax egg

How to Make a Flax Egg

Tremendously versatile in use, we include flax eggs in everything from our plant-based meatballs to our vegan cookies and pancakes. It’s a great egg substitute for binding in egg-free baking or cooking. In this post, we will tell you all about what a flax egg is, how to make one, and when to use it. We’ll also share our favorite recipes from the blog that use ground flaxseed.

8 minPrep Time:

8 minTotal Time:

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Ingredients

Instructions

  1. Add both ingredients to a small bowl and mix with a fork until fully combined. Set this bowl aside to allow the flax egg to thicken for at least 5 minutes before using it.
  2. This recipe makes 1 flax egg. Use 1 flax egg to replace each chicken egg for which your recipe calls.
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Tremendously versatile in use, we include flax eggs in everything from our plant-based meatballs to our vegan cookies and pancakes. It’s a great egg substitute for binding in egg-free baking or cooking. In this post, we will tell you all about what a flax egg is, how to make one, and when to use it. We’ll also share our favorite recipes from the blog that use ground flaxseed.

2 thoughts on “How to Make a Flax Egg for Vegan Baking

    1. Hi, Cyndy! Great question! Okay, so egg whites are used to provide volume or lift (aquafaba might be good here); whereas, egg yolks are used for fat to give your recipe bigger flavor and moistness as well as binding. To replace the fat from yolks you could probably use a mild-flavored oil or a couple tablespoons full fat coconut milk. Hope this helps!

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