Slow-Cooker Vegan Corned Beef

Vegan Corned Beef that is as meaty and flavorful as any non-vegan version we've ever had but made from seitan! The gorgeous color comes from beet puree, a much healthier alternative that still kicks ass! // plantpowercouple.com

Let’s get in the kitchen, pour ourselves a drink, and turn up the rebel music because we’re celebrating St Patrick’s Day vegan-style with this awesome recipe for Vegan Corned Beef!

For those of you who aren’t already familiar, corned beef & cabbage is a dish many Irish-Americans see as a quintessential component to their St Patrick’s Day traditions. During the weeks leading up to the feast day, we see this dish listed as a special at almost every Irish pub in Philly, so obviously, we had to make our own!


And make it we did…

Vegan Corned Beef that is as meaty and flavorful as any non-vegan version we've ever had but made from seitan! The gorgeous color comes from beet puree, a much healthier alternative that still kicks ass! // plantpowercouple.com

Traditionally, corned beef is made by taking a fatty piece of beef and soaking it in a salty / vinnegar-y brine for several days. Because this brine often contains nitrites, the meat has a bright pink color for which it’s known. It’s then often glazed or rubbed with some fresh black pepper and baked low & slow until a tender, flavorful roast results.

Vegan Corned Beef that is as meaty and flavorful as any non-vegan version we've ever had but made from seitan! The gorgeous color comes from beet puree, a much healthier alternative that still kicks ass! // plantpowercouple.com

For our vegan corned beef, we kept a lot of the traditional methods and flavor but updated the ingredients to, once again, prove that one need not surrender one’s ethics in favor of one’s traditions – aka, we’re gonna to show you how to make a totally kickass corned beef without anyone having to die.

Sounds pretty amazing, right? 😉

Vegan Corned Beef that is as meaty and flavorful as any non-vegan version we've ever had but made from seitan! The gorgeous color comes from beet puree, a much healthier alternative that still kicks ass! // plantpowercouple.com

First, you’ll make your seitan dough. This seitan recipe is a bit different from ones we have posted in the past, thanks in part to the AMAZING Connie from Connie’s RAWsome Kitchen on YouTube. If you’re looking for some serious outside-the-box cooking inspiration, she’s totally your girl! Here’s what we learned from Connie that helped make this dish incredible:

  1. Instead of chickpea flour or nutritional yeast, try adding some all-purpose flour to your seitan dough. It sounds totally weird, but it improves the texture by leaps and bounds. No more chewy, tough seitan!
  2. Once your seitan dough is made, wrap it in plastic wrap and allow it to sit in the fridge for at least an hour (or overnight). I knowww this makes the process that much longer, but a little planning ahead can go a long way with this one. After we tried this tip, our seitan firmed up SO much and the texture rocked.
  3. Have FUN with it! Sometimes, especially when developing recipes starts to become your actual job 🙋, you forget that cooking is supposed to be fun and experimental. Mistakes and miracles are both going to happen when you pursue anything remotely creative (and I 100% believe cooking is a creative endeavor), but you can’t be so afraid of the mistakes that you stop trying new things because then you’ll never get to the miracles…and this vegan corned beef recipe we’re sharing today is one of the miracles, btw. 😋

This beet puree is what makes our vegan corned beef recipe so *real*-looking. // plantpowercouple.com

This beet puree is what makes our vegan corned beef recipe so *real*-looking. // plantpowercouple.com

Connie also uses beets in many of her seitan recipes, something I knew I definitely wanted to do for this corned beef, much like we did in our seitan ham roast. It’s the perfect way to add that iconic bright pink color to your vegan corned beef, without any of the terrifying affects of nitrites. Seriously, Google search that stuff. It’s pretty frightening.

But for my beet-haters out there, I feel it’s important to let you know that, while beets are used a lot in this recipe, the end result does not taste like or even remotely resemble a beet. Trust me, I’m someone who has to hold her nose when cooking with beets because, just, eww, the five year old picky eater in me just simply cannot, but I do know how healthy they are, so I’m super pumped I found a way to make them virtually unrecognizeable but still attain some of the killer health benefits. Always a score with that one!

Vegan Corned Beef that is as meaty and flavorful as any non-vegan version we've ever had but made from seitan! The gorgeous color comes from beet puree, a much healthier alternative that still kicks ass! // plantpowercouple.com

More Seitan Recipes to Try:

Vegan Corned Beef that is as meaty and flavorful as any non-vegan version we've ever had but made from seitan! The gorgeous color comes from beet puree, a much healthier alternative that still kicks ass! // plantpowercouple.com

If you give this recipe a try for St Patrick’s Day or anytime, we would LOVE to know how it went and see your beautiful creations! Tag us in your drool-worthy photos on Instagram (we’re @theplantpowercouple, with the ‘the’) or Facebook (just Plant Power Couple there). We hope you enjoy this vegan corned beef recipe as much as we enjoyed creating it. Happy St Patrick’s Day!

Slow-Cooker Vegan Corned Beef

1 hr, 30 Prep Time:

5 hr, 30 Cook Time:

7 hrTotal Time:

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4 based on 2 review(s)

Recipe Image

Ingredients

    For the beet puree:
  • 2 14.5 oz cans sliced beets
  • For the seitan:
  • 1 cup + 2 Tbsp vital wheat gluten
  • 3 Tbsp all-purpose flour
  • 1 Tbsp brown sugar
  • 1 tsp sea salt
  • 1/2 tsp ground cumin
  • 1/2 tsp onion powder
  • 1/2 tsp garlic powder
  • 1/8 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 1/8 tsp ground allspice
  • 1/8 tsp ground mustard seeds
  • 2/3 cup beet puree
  • 1/3 cup refined coconut oil, melted
  • For the rub:
  • ground black pepper
  • sea salt
  • ground mustard seeds
  • ground allspice
  • For the brine:
  • 2 cups reserved water from canned beets
  • 1 cup water
  • 2/3 cup beet puree
  • 1 cup mushrooms, roughly chopped
  • 2 - 3 garlic cloves, crushed
  • 2 Tbsp rice wine vinegar
  • 1/8 tsp ground black pepper
  • 1 tsp sea salt
  • 1/2 tsp allspice berries
  • 1/2 tsp mustard seeds

Instructions

  1. First, get your beet puree ready: Open your cans and drain the water out of each of them, reserving it in a bowl for the brine. Then, add all the sliced beets to your food processor and blend until a puree is formed. Set this aside for now.
  2. Next, make your seitan dough: In a large mixing bowl, whisk together the gluten, flour, and all the spices. Make a well in the center of the mixture and pour in your melted coconut oil and 2/3 cup of the beet puree. Stir until combined. Then, get in there and knead the dough with your hands for about a minute.
  3. Cut a piece of plastic wrap into a large rectangle and sprinkle on a pinch of black pepper, ground mustard, ground allspice, and sea salt. Place the seitan dough on top of the seasonings and sprinkle the spices again on top of the loaf. Then, wrap the seitan dough tightly and stick it in the fridge for at least an hour or overnight.
  4. While your dough rests, get your brine ready by adding all the ingredients to your slow cooker and turn it on low.
  5. When time's up, take your seitan out of the fridge, unwrap it, and add it to the slow cooker. Cook on low for 2 hours, then flip and cook on high for another 2 hours.
  6. When the seitan has about 15 minutes left in the slow cooker, preheat your oven to 275F and grease a 9x9 baking dish. Sprinkle 1 tsp black pepper and 1/2 tsp sea salt into the bottom of the baking dish and carefully place your roast on top of it.
  7. Take about 1/4 cup of liquid from the slow cooker and pour it on top of the roast. Then, sprinkle it with 1 tsp black pepper and 1/2 tsp sea salt.
  8. Pop that baby in the oven and bake at 275F for 45 minutes. Then, use a spatula to carefully flip the roast, pour another 1/4 cup of liquid from the slow cooker on top, and once again sprinkle with salt and pepper. Bake for another 45 minutes.
  9. When the time is up, allow your roast to cool for at least 20-30 minutes before you slice it. Serve with cabbage & boiled potatoes for an awesome traditional meal. Enjoy!
7.6.8
116
http://www.plantpowercouple.com/recipes/slow-cooker-vegan-corned-beef/
ESHA Logo
Calories
1468 cal
Fat
73 g
Carbs
102 g
Protein
92 g


Click Here For Full Nutrition, Exchanges, and My Plate Info

Vegan Corned Beef that is as meaty and flavorful as any non-vegan version we've ever had but made from seitan! The gorgeous color comes from beet puree, a much healthier alternative that still kicks ass! // plantpowercouple.com

8 thoughts on “Slow-Cooker Vegan Corned Beef

  1. What are you thoughts about pressure cooking vs. slow cooking on this recipe? Yes I'm making it today LOL
    1. Hey, Amanda! We haven't tested the recipe in a pressure cooker and don't know much about them to be honest. But I know so many people who swear by making seitan in their Instant Pots, so I can see it being awesome! Let us know how it goes/went! :)
  2. I can't believe how good this is! Mine did not turn out pink despite using beet puree and liquid but I dont care. The flavor and texture are wonderful! I'm looking forward to using leftovers in a reuben!
    1. Yay!! I am jumping for joy reading this. So happy you enjoyed the recipe as much as we did! The pink color is so hit or miss, some people get no color and others have a REALLY BRIGHT pink. That's definitely a mystery we'll be working on in the future! :) But super pumped to hear you enjoyed the flavor and texture regardless.
  3. I did not like this recipe. It smelled so good and looks amazing. It really looks like meat. However it’s sweet and does not taste at all like the essence of corned beef. I see the point of the coconut oil because it looks like marbled fat in the loaf but that with the sugar made it taste like a dessert loaf and I think made it veer farthest from what I wanted. I’m also probably extra salty because it took so many hours to create! I cooked it right next to actual corned beef so I could tell at that point when mine smelled sweet and his smelled salty/sour it’d be off. I realllly want someone to create a loaf that tastes like the real thing cause it was one of my faves back in the meat eating days. PS I think this would make an excellent start for a tri tip or roast because of the look and texture, if you added beef seasonings and nixed the sugar!
    1. Hi, Shannon! Glad to hear you dug the smell and texture but sorry the flavor wasn't what you had hoped. That's the awesome thing about seitan recipes though - you can use the base recipe and adjust what you want more or less of. Hope you find your perfect vegan corned beef soon! Also, and I don't know if this is the case for your situation or not, but always be sure to use refined coconut oil for savory recipes like this, as unrefined will definitely give it that strong coconut / dessert-like quality. Good luck with your future seitan endeavors!
    1. Coconut oil naturally hardens at temperatures above 75F. For this recipe, unless it's warm enough where you are that the oil is already in a liquid state, you want to melt your coconut oil before measuring it by heating it in the microwave or carefully on a stove. :)

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